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Consumer Survey: Kia Sorento and Sportage ‘Best Value’ – Video Blog

Video Produced By: Super Car Haul

Kia Motors America (KMA) is one of the fastest-growing car companies in the U.S., and its two popular crossover utility vehicles have acquired an impressive collection of awards and accolades from industry observers. This week, the brand’s two CUVs received a different type of recognition when Strategic Vision revealed that new car buyers identified the 2013 Sorento and 2013 Sportage as the number one ranked vehicles in Total Value in the Medium and Small SUV segments, respectively, in the research firm’s latest Total Value Index@ (TVI) study.

2015 kia sportageMore than 350 new vehicles were vetted and over 77,000 buyers who purchased models from September 2011 to June 2012 were surveyed to compile Strategic Vision’s 16th annual TVI study, which revealed that quality and innovation shaped buyers’ opinion of overall values. “The result shows that innovation is the strongest single predictor of which cars, brands and corporations are seen as the best value, or ‘Total Value’ in our study,” stated Alexander Edwards, president of Strategic Vision.

“Kia takes great pride in advancing value to new levels of sophistication, and Strategic Vision’s ‘Total Value’ recognition is gratifying because it is based on feedback from Sorento and Sportage customers,” said Michael Sprague, executive vice president, marketing & communications, KMA. “This honor speaks to Kia’s goal of producing cars that are not only affordable but also dynamic in terms of their design, performance and cutting-edge technology attributes.” The Sorento combines fun and functionality in a refined and value-minded CUV with impressive power. Kia’s longest running nameplate, the Sportage, offers design and performance in a compact CUV with modern amenities and a fun-to-drive personality.

Kia’s Unprecedented Growth

Kia Motors is one of the world’s fastest moving global automotive brands; from 2009-2011 Kia launched more new vehicles in the U.S. than any other automaker, and under the guidance of chief design officer Peter Schreyer earned a reputation as an industry leader in automotive styling. Kia Motors America’s full line of fun-to-drive cars and CUVs has earned critical acclaim and dramatically increased consumer awareness, perception and consideration for the brand. In 2011, KMA recorded its 17th consecutive year of market share growth, thanks in part to the largest increase of any major brand in perceived quality[2] and the industry’s highest brand loyalty ranking[3]. Kia’s U.S.-based manufacturing facility in West Point, Georgia – KMMG – is responsible for the creation of more than 10,000 plant and supplier jobs and builds two of the company’s best-selling vehicles in the U.S. – the Sorento CUV and Optima midsize sedan*. Kia’s value and technology-laden lineup also includes the Sportage compact CUV, Soul urban passenger vehicle, Optima Hybrid, Forte compact sedan, Forte 5-door compact hatchback, Forte Koup two-door coupe, Rio and Rio 5-door sub-compacts and Sedona minivan.

About the 2013 Sorento

The 2013 Sorento incorporates all of the comforts of Kia’s signature crossover utility vehicle with the functionality consumers have come to expect. Built at Kia Motors’ U.S. manufacturing plant in West Point, Georgia, the Sorento can be powered by any one of three capable engines including a robust 3.5-liter V6 engine with sportmatic shifting. The Sorento also offers optional All-Wheel Drive, third-row seven-passenger seating, Bluetooth@[4], SiriusXM radio[5], Infinity@[6] surround sound and Kia’s UVO powered by Microsoft@ voice- activated infotainment and communication system[7]. The refined and value-minded 2013 Sorento is offered at a starting MSRP of $23,150[8].

About the 2013 Sportage

The 2013 Kia Sportage offers value-, image- and safety-conscious consumers a striking design and a standout combination of fun-to-drive performance, the latest in-vehicle technologies, and an abundance of comfort, convenience and safety features all at a tremendous value. The sleek and modern Sportage is available with either a 2.4-liter, 176 horsepower engine or a 2.0-liter, 260 horsepower Turbo GDI engine. Inside the cabin, the Sportage offers a host of available technology features, including Kia’s all new UVO Powered by Microsoft@ hands-free, voice-activated infotainment system. The 2013 Sportage features a starting MSRP of $19,000[9].

About Kia Motors America

Kia Motors America is the marketing and distribution arm of Kia Motors Corporation based in Seoul, South Korea. KMA offers a complete line of vehicles through more than 755 dealers throughout the United States and serves as the “Official Automotive Partner” of the NBA and LPGA. In 2011, KMA recorded its best-ever annual sales total and became one of the fastest growing car companies in the U.S. [10] Kia is poised to continue its momentum and will continue to build the brand through design innovation, quality, value, advanced safety features and new technologies.

Information about Kia Motors America and its full vehicle line-up is available at its website – www.kia.com. For media information, including photography, visit www.kiamedia.com.

About Strategic Vision

Strategic Vision is a research-based consultancy with over thirty-five years of experience in understanding the consumers’ and constituents’ decision-making systems for a variety of Fortune 100 clients, including most automotive manufacturers. Its unique expertise is in identifying consumers’ comprehensive motivational hierarchies, including the product attributes, personal benefits, value/emotions and images that drive perceptions and behaviors.

[1] Based on 5-year cumulative growth between 12-month retail sales for periods ending October 2007 and October 2012 of all U.S.

automotive brands.

*The Sorento and Optima GDI (EX Trims and certain LX Trims only) and GDI Turbo are built in the United States from U.S. and globally

sourced parts.

[2] Source: Automotive Lease Guide Spring 2011 Perceived Quality Study.

[3] Source: Experian Automotive Q2 2011 market analysis.

[4]The Bluetooth@ word mark and logos are registered trademarks owned by Bluetooth SIG, Inc. and any use of such marks by Kia is under license. Other trademarks and tradenames are those of their respective owners. A compatible Bluetooth@ wireless technology enabled cell phone is required to use Bluetooth@ wireless technology.

[5]Sirius services require subscriptions, sold separately after 3-month trial included with vehicle purchase/lease. Subscriptions governed by SiriusXM Customer Agreement at siriusxm.com5/8 2011 SiriusXM Radio Inc. Sirius, XM and all related marks and logos are trademarks of SiriusXM Radio Inc.

[6] Infinity is a registered trademark of Harman International Industries, Incorporated.

[7] UVO is optional equipment and available with select packages. Microsoft is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries.

[8] MSRP for Sorento LX excludes $800 destination and handling fee, title, taxes, license, options and dealer charges. Actual prices set by dealer and may vary.

[9] Starting prices for Sportage bases are manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP), which excludes $800 destination and handling fee, title, taxes, license, options and dealer charges. Actual prices set by dealer and may vary.

[10] Based on 5-year cumulative growth between 12-month retail sales for periods ending October 2007 and October 2012 of all U.S. automotive brands.

SOURCE Kia Motors America

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Posted by on December 10, 2012 in Automotive, technology, Video Blog

 

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History of the Christmas Tree – Video Blog

WordPress no longer allow History channel video content, please click here to see a brief video: History Channel

How It All Got Started

Long before the advent of Christianity, plants and trees that remained green all year had a special meaning for people in the winter. Just as people today decorate their homes during the festive season with pine, spruce, and fir trees, ancient peoples hung evergreen boughs over their doors and windows. In many countries it was believed that evergreens would keep away witches, ghosts, evil spirits, and illness.

In the Northern hemisphere, the shortest day and longest night of the year falls on December 21 or December 22 and is called the winter solstice. Many ancient people believed that the sun was a god and that winter came every year because the sun god had become sick and weak. They celebrated the solstice because it meant that at last the sun god would begin to get well. Evergreen boughs reminded them of all the green plants that would grow again when the sun god was strong and summer would return.

The ancient Egyptians worshipped a god called Ra, who had the head of a hawk and wore the sun as a blazing disk in his crown. At the solstice, when Ra began to recover from the illness, the Egyptians filled their homes with green palm rushes which symbolized for them the triumph of life over death.

Early Romans marked the solstice with a feast called the Saturnalia in honor of Saturn, the god of agriculture. The Romans knew that the solstice meant that soon farms and orchards would be green and fruitful. To mark the occasion, they decorated their homes and temples with evergreen boughs. In Northern Europe the mysterious Druids, the priests of the ancient Celts, also decorated their temples with evergreen boughs as a symbol of everlasting life. The fierce Vikings in Scandinavia thought that evergreens were the special plant of the sun god, Balder.

Germany is credited with starting the Christmas tree tradition as we now know it in the 16th century when devout Christians brought decorated trees into their homes. Some built Christmas pyramids of wood and decorated them with evergreens and candles if wood was scarce. It is a widely held belief that Martin Luther, the 16th-century Protestant reformer, first added lighted candles to a tree. Walking toward his home one winter evening, composing a sermon, he was awed by the brilliance of stars twinkling amidst evergreens. To recapture the scene for his family, he erected a tree in the main room and wired its branches with lighted candles.

Most 19th-century Americans found Christmas trees an oddity. The first record of one being on display was in the 1830s by the German settlers of Pennsylvania, although trees had been a tradition in many German homes much earlier. The Pennsylvania German settlements had community trees as early as 1747. But, as late as the 1840s Christmas trees were seen as pagan symbols and not accepted by most Americans.

It is not surprising that, like many other festive Christmas customs, the tree was adopted so late in America. To the New England Puritans, Christmas was sacred. The pilgrims‘s second governor, William Bradford, wrote that he tried hard to stamp out “pagan mockery” of the observance, penalizing any frivolity. The influential Oliver Cromwell preached against “the heathen traditions” of Christmas carols, decorated trees, and any joyful expression that desecrated “that sacred event.” In 1659, the General Court of Massachusetts enacted a law making any observance of December 25 (other than a church service) a penal offense; people were fined for hanging decorations. That stern solemnity continued until the 19th century, when the influx of German and Irish immigrants undermined the Puritan legacy.

In 1846, the popular royals, Queen Victoria and her German Prince, Albert, were sketched in the Illustrated London News standing with their children around a Christmas tree. Unlike the previous royal family, Victoria was very popular with her subjects, and what was done at court immediately became fashionable—not only in Britain, but with fashion-conscious East Coast American Society. The Christmas tree had arrived.

By the 1890s Christmas ornaments were arriving from Germany and Christmas tree popularity was on the rise around the U.S. It was noted that Europeans used small trees about four feet in height, while Americans liked their Christmas trees to reach from floor to ceiling.

The early 20th century saw Americans decorating their trees mainly with homemade ornaments, while the German-American sect continued to use apples, nuts, and marzipan cookies. Popcorn joined in after being dyed bright colors and interlaced with berries and nuts. Electricity brought about Christmas lights, making it possible for Christmas trees to glow for days on end. With this, Christmas trees began to appear in town squares across the country and having a Christmas tree in the home became an American tradition.

Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree

The Rockefeller Center tree is located at Rockefeller Center, west of Fifth Avenue from 47th through 51st Streets inNew York City.

The Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree dates back to the Depression Era days. The tallest tree displayed at Rockefeller Center came in 1948 and was a Norway Spruce that measured in at 100 feet tall and hailed from Killingworth, Connecticut.

The first tree at Rockefeller Center was placed in 1931. It was a small unadorned tree placed by construction workers at the center of the construction site. Two years later, another tree was placed there, this time with lights. These days, the giant Rockefeller Center tree is laden with over 25,000 Christmas lights.

Source: History Channel

Compiled By: Josh Martin

 
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Posted by on November 29, 2012 in History, Holiday Articles, Video Blog

 

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Timeless Christmas Gifts for your Children

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It’s time to get over the sugar rush from Halloween and gear up for the rest of the holidays. I have been thinking of Christmas more than Thanksgiving. Don’t get me wrong I love thanksgiving as much as the next fella, but if you want to make a magical Christmas for your family you should start buying presents yesterday. My best advise is buy on sale and buy early. Every time you go into a Target or Walmart you should go past the sales rack for toys, stocking stuffers, etc.

Not to say I practice what I preach. Every other year I find myself fighting over the last “tickle me Elmo” on Christmas Eve. If you’re like me you procrastinate because you just can’t decide on the perfect gifts. Below is an article from “The Telegraph” that outlines all of the gadgets and toys that are sure to sell out. I hope this helps you to make your mind up and avoid the Christmas eve mania.

(Personally, I want to get my hands on the new “Furby”)

By: Josh Martin
________________________________________________________________________________________

Children go back to the future this Christmas
By:

Published By: Telegraph.co.uk

Boys can buy the ‘costume’ of each turtle – Leonardo, Michelangelo, Donatello and Raphael – complete with weapon, such as nunchucks.

And fans of the 1990s phenomenon Furby can now buy an updated version of the little round toy. The battery operated hairy creatures speak their own language – Furbish – but will slowly learn English as their new owner nurtures them.

In a modern twist, owners can control the Furby using an iPad app. The app ‘swipes’ food into the mouth of the creature, which acknowledges being fed by chewing. The Furby will even spit unwanted food, such as chicken bones, back onto the iPad’s screen.

Spiderman and Lego, both of which are hardly modern, are also expected to be big sellers this year.

Gary Grant, managing director of toy chain The Entertainer and the chairman of the Dream Toys selection panel, said that there is a trend for parents buying their children toys that grown-ups connect with their own youth.

“If you look at this year’s list, Cabbage Patch Kids came out 30 years ago, Furbies were 15 years ago, Spiderman is one of the all-time favourite superhero characters and Lego has been around for more than 50 years.

“These kinds of products do have parental approval. If there was a product they had as a kid they will buy it for their kids. We lavish some of our childhood on our own children,” said Mr Grant.

A spokesman for Flair, the games manufacturer behind the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles relaunch, said that the products are designed to appeal to children but also their fathers who were into the products the first time around. Fans of the turtles are affectionately known as ‘Sewerheads”, the spokesman said.

“We want to get the dads who were interested then as well as their kids now. There are some dads in their 30s who still have the original figures from the first time,” the spokesman said.

Cabbage Patch Kids, Furbies, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and Twister are among the dolls and games that manufacturers are putting out in time for the £3 billion Christmas toy market.

Cabbage Patch Kids, which originated in the US and became a worldwide craze in the 1980s, will be 30 years old next year and have been relaunched by maker Jakks Pacific.

The dolls, which sold in their millions, have a bizarre back story: they are ‘found’ in vegetable gardens and are ‘adopted’ by children.

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, meanwhile, have been re-released as talking action figures. The franchise about four turtles who live in a sewer and are named after great artists of the Renaissance first came to prominence in the late 1980s with a TV show and series of films.

Boys can buy the ‘costume’ of each turtle – Leonardo, Michelangelo, Donatello and Raphael – complete with weapon, such as nunchucks.

And fans of the 1990s phenomenon Furby can now buy an updated version of the little round toy. The battery operated hairy creatures speak their own language – Furbish – but will slowly learn English as their new owner nurtures them.

In a modern twist, owners can control the Furby using an iPad app. The app ‘swipes’ food into the mouth of the creature, which acknowledges being fed by chewing. The Furby will even spit unwanted food, such as chicken bones, back onto the iPad’s screen.

Spiderman and Lego, both of which are hardly modern, are also expected to be big sellers this year.

Gary Grant, managing director of toy chain The Entertainer and the chairman of the Dream Toys selection panel, said that there is a trend for parents buying their children toys that grown-ups connect with their own youth.

“If you look at this year’s list, Cabbage Patch Kids came out 30 years ago, Furbies were 15 years ago, Spiderman is one of the all-time favourite superhero characters and Lego has been around for more than 50 years.

“These kinds of products do have parental approval. If there was a product they had as a kid they will buy it for their kids. We lavish some of our childhood on our own children,” said Mr Grant.

A spokesman for Flair, the games manufacturer behind the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles relaunch, said that the products are designed to appeal to children but also their fathers who were into the products the first time around. Fans of the turtles are affectionately known as ‘Sewerheads”, the spokesman said.

“We want to get the dads who were interested then as well as their kids now. There are some dads in their 30s who still have the original figures from the first time,” the spokesman said.

By:
Mrs. Fields

 
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Posted by on November 2, 2012 in Holiday Articles, Parenting, Video Blog

 

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