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History of The New Jersey Shores Food and Boardwalks

Home Made Jersey Shore Video:

Tastes of the Jersey Shore

new jersey lobsters, new jersey crabs, old advertisment, old image, funny, crab suit

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By: Tom Wilk
From saltwater taffy to seafood dinners, the Jersey Shore has always offered vacationers plenty of options to satisfy any appetite. Author Karen L. Schnitzspahn takes a look at the foods that lined the boardwalks and filled the dinner plates at Shore restaurants in “Jersey Shore Food History: Victorian Feasts to Boardwalk Treats” (American Palate/The History Press; 2012).

“Food is a big part of the Shore culture,” she says, in explaining the inspiration for the book. A New Jersey native who lives in Little Silver, Schnitzspahn fondly recalls visiting her grandparents in Margate in the 1950s.

“I remember going to Hackney’s and ordering lobster as a child. I thought it was the greatest thing in the world,” she says. The Atlantic City restaurant accommodated up to 3,200 patrons and featured waitresses in lobster costumes at the Miss America parade and in promotional materials to highlight its signature dish.

Schnitzspahn shows how Shore cuisine has evolved from the 19th century to the present. An 1850 breakfast menu from Congress Hall in Cape May offers standard fare, such as scrambled eggs and fried potatoes. However, the first four items listed are unlikely to grace most breakfast tables today: beef steaks, mutton chops, fresh fish and tripe. “I think that was the European influence,” she says, as the breakfast offerings also included kidneys, liver and clam fritters.

Other popular dishes fell out of favor with the passage of time. Celia Brown’s, a Belmar drive-in, offered a pineapple with cream cheese sandwich for 20 cents in the mid-1930s. And restaurants were not above adding a side of hyperbole to their meals. “We make the best Chocolate Ice Cream Soda in the World or any other place,” Celia Brown’s menu proclaimed.

alan brechmna, 1979, atlatic ciyt, dip stix

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Schnitzspahn offers short profiles of Shore institutions, including Kohr Brothers ice cream, Max’s Famous Hot Dogs in Long Branch and the Knife and Fork Inn in Atlantic City. Interspersed through the book are 90 photographs and illustrations. Some demonstrate the visual element in marketing food and drink.

After the repeal of Prohibition in 1933, the Ritz Carlton Hotel in Atlantic City celebrated the occasion with a merry-go-round bar that made it stand out from other watering holes. The WindMill restaurant in Long Branch remains a landmark that creates a lasting impression with its white vanes.

To give readers the opportunity to sample Shore cuisine through the ages, Schnitzspahn has reprinted more than 20 recipes. They range from an 1873 recipe for mock turtle soup served at the West End Hotel in Long Branch to a recipe for funnel cake, the popular boardwalk snack.

“I like to eat, but I don’t consider myself a foodie,” says Schnitzspahn, who tried out some of the recipes with her two grandchildren, including one for blancmange from the 19th century.

Today, she sees the Shore adapting to keep up with culinary trends, such as the farm-to-table movement and the growing demand for organic food. “There are now more vegetarian options and vegan restaurants,” she says.

Schnitzspahn believes Shore restaurants can handle all tastes. “There’s something for everybody, whether you want to hold a meal in your hand or sit down to a spectacular five-course dinner.”

View A Slide Show of 1900s New Jersey photos here.

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History of the New Jersey Board Walk

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Nothing is more New Jersey than its boardwalks. Hundreds of thousands of visitors and residents enjoy the unique entertainment that these iconic wooden pathways provide along the Jersey Shore.

Many towns along the state’s 130 miles of ocean coastline boast a boardwalk and each one has its own individuality. Family-friendly, bustling, romantic or sophisticated, Jersey Shore boardwalk towns have dozens of distinct styles that appeal to all ages.

The boardwalk as we know it today – a raised promenade of plank boards straddling the sandy coastline – first appeared in Atlantic City in 1870, making it the world’s first. Today, it’s also the world’s longest.

Its initial purpose was pragmatic, intending to minimize the amount of sand trafficked into seaside hotels and train cars, but it wasn’t long before the boardwalk was inserted into the public consciousness as a symbol of good times and easy living.

New Jersey boardwalks are very distinctive. Writer Jeff Schlegel put it best in an article in the Washington Post, when he stated candidly, “With all due respect to Coney Island and Virginia Beach, no place in the country matches the breadth and depth of boardwalk culture found along the Jersey Shore.”

atlatic city, black and white, 1967, tram car

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In addition to Atlantic City, Jersey Shore boardwalks offer something for everyone. The mile long boardwalk in Point Pleasant Beach is a super family-friendly promenade with tons of rides and arcades for kids, a wide beach, restaurants, bars and even an aquarium.

To the south of Point Pleasant Beach is the Seaside Heights boardwalk that features the Casino and Funtown piers amusement parks. The mile long boardwalk is action-packed and one of the most popular and most visited in the state and is a magnet for young people. It’s full of game stands, rides, arcades and even a waterpark.

Near the southern most tip of New Jersey Wildwood has a total of five amusement piers, dozens of carnival games, souvenir shops, food stands, waterparks and world-class roller coasters. This bustling boardwalk draws tons of visitors to enjoy all the amusements, the expansive beach and the many special events.

For those seeking a quieter setting Spring Lake offers residents and vacationers alike an unhurried and peaceful atmosphere that has made the town a highly-desirable destination at the Jersey Shore for more than 100 years. Along with its uncluttered beach, the two-mile long boardwalk is the longest non-commercial boardwalk in New Jersey and provides a unique atmosphere for all visitors.

So, when in New Jersey, don’t miss out on the unforgettable experience of visiting our state’s boardwalks.

Compiled By: Josh Martin

Sources:
visitnj.com
Philly.com
NJ.com

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Posted by on September 25, 2013 in History, Music Video, Uncategorized, Video Blog

 

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Grilled Salmon on Cedar Planks in 5 Simple Steps

Too many people pack up their grills for the winter after Labor Day. Unless it’s snowing you should grill well into fall and early winter. Perhaps you’ve gotten sick of burgers, steaks, and hot dogs. Let’s try something a little more challenging; I hope you enjoy my “Cedar Planked Salmon”.

Ingredients:
4-10 oz Salmon filetsnowy grill, grilling in the snow, webber grill, josh martin blog
2 cedar planks

Rub Ingredients (optional):
1 tablespoon sea salt
1 tablespoon brown sugar
1 garlic powder
1 teaspoon orange peel
1 teaspoon lime flavor,
1 teaspoon chili powder

Directions:

1) Soak your cedar planks in water for at least on hour before cooking. (You can use your own cedar planks,but I recommend using food safe cedar such as, fire and flavor)

Cider Planks, grilled Salmon, Recipe, josh martin blog

2) Mix all or the rub ingredient together in a small bowl. Generously pour the spice mixture in a line down the center of the filet. Rub the mixture in to the filet thoroughly.

salmon rub. grilled, salmon, recipe, josh martin blog, how to

3) Heat your grill to 350°F. Add the soaked planks to grill. Close the cover and heat for at least 3 minutes. (don’t heat them longer than 5 minutes or it will prematurely char)

grilled salmon, cedar planks, josh martin blog, how to, about, make

4) Flip the cedar planks and add your salmon to the heated side of the plank. Next close the lid for 12-15 minutes.

heated cedar planks, grilling salmon, josh martin blog

grilling-salmon-joshmartinblog.com-josh martin-cidar planks-american bbq- fish fry

Note: you can also grill asparagus, zucchini, eggplant, etc. on your cedar planks

5) Serve and enjoy!
asparagus, grilled salmon, mashed potatos

By: Josh Martin

Have a Questions? Ask me below:

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You may also like to grill: My Grand Mothers Cheeseburgers / Hamburgers

 
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Posted by on September 23, 2013 in American Food, recipes

 

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Benedictine, a short history and the original recipe.

History:

temp[Benedictine or Benedictine Spread is a condiment made with cucumbers, onions and cream cheese. It is used to make cucumber sandwiches and was invented around the turn of the 20th century by Jennie Carter Benedict, a caterer and restaurateur in Louisville, Kentucky. Benedict opened her restaurant in 1893. It was there that she invented and originally served benedictine. Originally used for sandwiches, benedictine has in recent years been used as a dip for chips and filling for potatoes.

“Louisvillians quiz guests and younger family members on the origin of Benedictine. The famous cucumber spread was, of course, created by one of our city’s most famous residents, Jennie C. Benedict. Setting the highest of culinary standards, “Miss Jennie” was also a successful businesswoman, a writer who for a time served as editor of The Courier-Journal’s Household section, and an important community volunteer.

The University Press of Kentucky has republished Jennie Benedict’s The Blue Ribbon Cook Book, from the fourth edition, 1922.” Susan Reigler, former restaurant critic and travel editor of The C-J, has written the Introduction, and for the first time the recipe for Benedictine Spread is published. The wonder is that it was never included in the other five editions, or in Benedict’s autobiography. Maybe she considered her recipe as secret as Colonel Sanders did his herbs and spices for chicken.

Reigler writes lovingly of her own youth when young ladies wore white gloves and munched cream cheese-and-nut sandwiches, based on Benedict’s concoction, in the restaurant of the old Stewart’s Dry Goods department store. She recounts the influence of recipes on today’s restaurants and home cooks as well.

A close variation of Miss Jennie’s “Stuffed Eggplant” has been on the menu of Simpsonville’s Old Stone Inn for many years. Louisville’s Kathy Cary at Lilly’s serves her own version of Benedictine, as do Chef Matt Weber at the Uptown Café, and Ouita Michel at Holly Hill Inn in Midway. Holly Hill’s sous-chef, Lisa Laufer, supplies her recipe for this book.

Reigler gives an interesting picture of the woman who, in 1893, started a catering business from her home. Benedict soon began defining Louisville’s tastes as she catered parties and weddings of its most prominent citizens and fed the middle class in her tearooms.

Miss Jennie’s menus became musts for Derby Day celebrations. Through the decades her cookbook remains popular. Reigler says, “I had many, many calls from readers trying to locate a copy. …”

The Blue Ribbon Cook Book contains a Glossary that is a cooking lesson in itself. The large sections on “Entrees” and “Desserts” are complemented by interesting advice in “Sick Room Cookery,” and practical kitchen tricks.

Probably the most intriguing recipe of all is that which keeps Miss Jennie’s name on Louisville lips. Here is the version supplied by cookbook author and former Courier-Journal food editor Ronni Lundy. It is the one that Jennie C. Benedict would most likely have included in her book:

Benedictine spread

· 8 ounces of cream cheese, softened
· 3 tablespoons cucumber juice
· 1 tablespoon onion juice
· 1 teaspoon salt
· a few grains of cayenne pepper
· 2 drops green food coloring

To get the juice, peel and grate a cucumber, then wrap in a clean dish towel and squeeze juice into a dish. Discard pulp. Do the same for the onion. Mix all ingredients with a fork until well blended. Using a blender will make the spread too runny.”

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(Above) The interior of Jennie Benedict’s restaurant at 554 S. Fourth Street in downtown Louisville. The establishment opened in 1900 and was sold in 1925 for $50,000. Benedict was trained in New York by Fanny Farmer.

Weekend Edition Saturday Transcript:

temp[Cream cheese, cucumber juice and a touch of onion. That may sound like an unlikely combination, but Benedictine is a Kentucky favorite. Gwynne Potts, a self-proclaimed aficionado, says it’s delicious.

“The best thing to eat Benedictine on is just white bread,” Potts says. “No special bread; it only takes away from the Benedictine.”

Potts, who grew up in Louisville, Ky., has been enjoying the creamy combo for six decades. And for the first 18 years of her life, she says, Benedictine was like ketchup. She assumed it was eaten everywhere until, as a college student, she took a spring break trip to Florida.

“We couldn’t imagine having lunch without Benedictine,” Potts says. “We went from store to store, saying, ‘Where’s your Benedictine?’ And they just looked at us. It was the first time I realized the whole world didn’t know about Benedictine.”

Years later, that’s still pretty much the case. But this creamy, cool cucumber spread has persisted in Kentucky ever since Jennie Benedict, a famous Louisville caterer, invented it around the turn of the 20th century.

Benedict opened a tearoom on downtown Louisville’s South Fourth Street in 1911. Back then, that was the city’s bustling commercial center, packed with stores, cafes, theaters and hotels. Today, it’s a few boutiques and several wig shops.

Susan Reigler, a former restaurant critic for Louisville’s newspaper, The Courier-Journal, wrote the introduction to the re-release of Benedict’s Blue Ribbon Cook Book in 2008. Reigler says Benedict’s role in the city’s culinary history was huge and that the roots of many of the city’s flavors can be traced back to her recipes.

Of course, some of Benedict’s concoctions have fallen out of favor — like calf brains and peptonized oysters for the sick. But Reigler says Benedictine has endured.

“I think it’s just very different. It’s very refreshing. It’s a light spread,” she says. “What could be more light and delicate than cucumber juice?”

temp[One source of contention among Louisville chefs is whether to include the two drops of green food coloring that Benedict used in her recipe. The dye lets people know that it’s not just a plain cream cheese spread, but the practice is no longer popular with chefs like Kathy Cary, who prefer more natural ingredients. Cary has owned Lilly’s, a restaurant that specializes in Kentucky cuisine, for the past 25 years. For her, the dish is truly a way to showcase both local cucumbers and local traditions.

“Mine is really about … celebrating the cucumbers,” Cary says. “Obviously, no dye, no food coloring. And it’s filled with texture, and sort of the crunch of the cucumbers.”

Some cooks serve Benedictine as a dip, others as tea sandwiches with the crusts cut off. But Cary usually puts hers into a hearty sandwich with homemade mayonnaise, bacon, bibb lettuce and sprouts.

However you serve it, Benedictine is best accompanied with another Kentucky signature: bourbon.

Sources: Wikipedia, NRP.org, The Courier Journal
Compiled By: Josh Martin

 

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Grandmothers Homemade Hamburgers / Cheeseburgers

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Ingredients:
2lbs Ground beef
3/4 cup Parmesan cheese
3 eggs
1 cup breadcrumbs
2 tablespoons garlic powder
1 tablespoon salt or Tony Cacheres Creole Seasoning
4 tablespoons colgin Liquid Smoke
5 tablespoons Lea & Perkins Worcestershire sauce
2 Packages of hamburger buns
1 Package of Velveeta cheese or thinly sliced cheddar cheese (optional)
2-3 Tomatoes (optional)
1-2 large white onions (optional)

Directions:

1) Combine ground beef, eggs, parmesan cheese, breadcrumbs, Garlic powder, salt (or Tony Cacheres Creole Seasoning), Worcestershire sauce, and liquid smoke in a large mixing bowl.

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2) Mix ingredients, by hand; until all of the are ingredients mixed evenly.

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3) Form the meat into 3-4″ patties, by slapping it between your hands.

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4) Once all of your patties are made. Place them closely on to a grill or frying pan, on medium heat. Make sure to flip your patties often and try to lift them with the grill marks grain.

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5) Once the patties show grill marks, are golden brown, and have no more pink meat in the center; you are ready to serve up!
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6) Server with you favorite toppings and Barbecue sides. Personally I like corn on the cob with cold pasta salad as my sides.
20130601-181923.jpgBy: Josh Martin

 
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Posted by on June 13, 2013 in recipes, Recipies

 

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Easy Home Made Chicken Pesto

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Ingredients:


2 cups fresh basil leaves, packed
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan-Reggiano or Romano cheese (or grated Parmesan)
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
1/3 cup pine walnuts
3 tablespoons minced garlic cloves
2 Chicken Breasts
1 13oz package of pasta
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
A handful of spinach leaves

Directions:

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1) Combine spinach and basil with walnuts nuts, pulse a few times in a food processor. Add the garlic, pulse a few times more.

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2) Slowly add the olive oil in a constant stream while the food processor is on. Stop to scrape down the sides of the food processor with a rubber spatula. Add the grated cheese and pulse again until blended. Add a pinch of salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste. Now put the sauce mixture aside.

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3) Place chicken breasts in a large pot. Pour 2-3 cups of water onto the chicken, until it is submerged. Bring the water to a boil, then turn down the heat to medium.

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4) Once the pot has simmered for 10 minutes, strain off any fat that has rose to the top.

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5) After the chicken is white and floating, place the chicken on a cutting board to cool(always make sure your meat is properly cooked). Bring the water you boiled the chicken in back to a boil.

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6) Begin to boil your pasta. Now that the chicken has cooled some, you can start cutting the chicken breasts into strips.

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7) Once your pasta is tender and strained of water, combine sauce mixture, chicken, and pasta in your large pot. Stir the ingredients together thoroughly.

20130222-125327.jpg8) Server with bread and salad, enjoy!
By: Josh Martin

 

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Posted by on February 22, 2013 in Italian Food, recipes, Recipies, Uncategorized

 

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Bold Smothered Pork Chops

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Ingredients:

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 2 tablespoons garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon cayenne
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 4 pork chops, 3/4-inch thick
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1 can french onion soup
  • Chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley, for garnish

Directions:

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1) Put the flour in a shallow platter and add the onion powder, garlic powder, cayenne, salt, and pepper; mix with a fork to distribute evenly.
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2) Pat the pork chops dry with paper towels to remove any moisture and then dredge them in the seasoned flour; shaking off the excess.
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3) Heat a large saute pan or cast iron skillet over medium heat and coat with the oil. When the oil is nice and hot, lay the pork chops in the pan in a single layer and fry for 3 minutes on each side until golden brown.
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4) Remove the pork chops from the pan and add the rest of the seasoned flour to the pan drippings. Mix the flour into the fat to dissolve and then pour in the French onion soup in. Fill the empty can with water and add to the mixture. Stir to make a creamy gravy and return the pork chops to the pan, covering them with the sauce. Simmer for 5 minutes until the pork is cooked through. Season with salt and pepper and garnish with chopped parsley before serving. Pour excess sauce over you pork chops.

(typically I serve this with broccoli and Au Gratin)

Enjoy!
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By: Josh Martin

 
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Posted by on January 25, 2013 in recipes, Recipies

 

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Homemade Candied Yams (Sweet Potatoes)

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Ingredients:

1 large sweet potato (yam)
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 tablespoon nutmeg
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/2 cup water
1 tablespoon olive oil

Directions:

1) Dice sweet potato into medium sized chunks
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2) Place diced sweet potato into a medium sauce pan. Cover the sweet potato with water and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium and simmer for about 15 minutes.
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3) Remove the sweet potato from the water once it is tender, but still mildly crunchy. Combine sweet potato, cinnamon, nutmeg, sugar, olive oil and water in a medium sized skillet. Stir and sauté for about 10 minutes on medium-low heat.
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4) Enjoy, once the sugar has caramelized into a thick black sauce and the potato is tender.20121213-122256.jpg
By: Josh Martin

 
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Posted by on December 13, 2012 in recipes, Recipies

 

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